Category Archives: Medical entrance

Which School?

Which high school should you go to, if you are aspiring to study medicine?
There are several factors to consider. One of them is to look at their track record of getting students into medicine.
Some ‘prestigious’ schools are happy to sit on their laurels and are more interested in ‘political correctness’ than helping their students achieve their goals.
Some have the ideological ‘fixed mindset’ while some schools believe in ‘growth mindset’.
For example, some schools actively encourage and help students to prepare for UMAT/Interviews while some take the ‘official’ line and happy to benefit from the kudos of their students’ hard work and success. The oldest and most reputable schools may not necessarily be the best.
Which school is most likely to help your child get into medicine may change with time: it partly depends on the careers counsellor and the leadership team of the school at that time.
MedEntry can provide advice on which are the better schools if you are unsure.

Effective Learning in the UMAT

Learning is not just about sitting in front of a text book and hoping the content will diffuse into your mind through osmosis. In order to learn effectively, you must learn actively, not passively. Active learning will allow you to engage with what you are learning and absorb it faster. New study strategies will also be introduced in this article so you can in-corporate them into your UMAT study. This will give your UMAT study sessions a direction and allow you to set goals.

What is active learning?

Active learning is all about engaging with what you are learning and how you absorb the knowledge. Learning is most effective when you assimilate new knowledge with old knowledge you already have. For example, if you just learnt something new about clouds, you may connect it to what you already know about clouds. Other strategies include converting what you just learnt into pictures or diagrams, or even explaining the new concept to others. These strategies allow you to use the new knowledge, and in turn, absorb it better.

Passive learners tend to just read the new content and try to remember it without connecting it to anything they already know. They may not even apply the new knowledge to a practice problem.

A good analogy to represent active learners and passive learners is in learning to use a toaster. An active learner, after purchasing the toaster will use it in their home, they will assimilate the appliance with the appliances they already have at home. A passive learner, on the other hand, will just watch people make toast and assume they know how to make toast.

The Key to Effective learning in the UMAT:

Effective learning is being aware of what you know about what you know. To learn effectively, you must learn actively. This may be learning there may be gaps in your knowledge, or knowing what you are good it.

Instead of just trying to learn skills for the UMAT, you can try a few of these study strategies below to try and enhance what you just learnt. These study strategies allow self-awareness during learning.

Effective study strategies:

  • I draw pictures or diagrams to help me understand the UMAT questions.
  • After learning about a new UMAT concept, I like to make up questions and answer them using the new concept.
  • When I am learning something new in the UMAT, I like to think back to what I already know about it.
  • I discuss what I am studying in the UMAT with others.
  • I practice UMAT drills over and over until I know the strategies well.
  • I think about my thinking to check if I understand the ideas.
  • When I don’t understand something in the UMAT, I like to go back over it again.
  • I make a note of things that I didn’t understand very well in a UMAT drill or practice exam, so that I can follow up on them at a later date.
  • When I have finished a UMAT drill or practice exam, I look back to see how well I did.
  • I organize my time to manage my UMAT study.
  • I make plans for how to do a UMAT drill or practice exam.

Plan before you study:

Before you start a study session, ask yourself the following questions. They will give you an aim to work towards and note down anything important for future learning.

  • What is your goal for today’s UMAT study session?
  • What will be the important ideas in today’s study session?
  • What do you already know about this topic?

Reflect after you study:

After a study session, it is always useful to reflect on what you have learnt to help your mind consolidate new knowledge. It also helps in finding questions to ask before your next session.

  • What can you relate today’s knowledge to?
  • What will you do to remember the key strategies?
  • Is there anything about this topic that you don’t understand or are not clear about?

Final note:

Using these strategies may make studying for the UMAT more engaging and allow you to learn UMAT concepts better. If you don’t already utilize any of the above techniques, it may be a good idea to start with just a few to see if there is a difference in whether you remember new knowledge better.

 

 

Staying in control during the UMAT

Below are a few useful tips as to how to stay in control during the UMAT.

Distractions:

  • One of the things you’ll probably have to deal with during the UMAT is distractions. This may be someone sniffling, or coughing, or tapping a pencil. In fact there have even been stories of distractions ranging from pile drivers at a nearby construction site to the school’s symphonic band practicing outside!
  • The most important thing is to not let these distractions get to you, use them as a reminder to get back to the UMAT in front of you.

Keep moving while the clock is ticking:

  • Don’t count on the supervisor being accurate or consistent about writing up the time remaining during the UMAT. You should monitor your time continually as you work through the UMAT exam.
  • To avoid time warps and spacing out during the UMAT, keep your pencil moving every few seconds, marking up your UMAT test booklet. Don’t ever let you pencil lift more than a few centimetres off the page – keep it poised to mark up questions.
  • Try not to spend forever filling in the bubbles on the UMAT answer sheet. It’s not uncommon to see a student in the exam room artistically darkening a bubble for 10-15 seconds. That is a total of 3 minutes wasted on the entire UMAT!
  • Use absolutely every second available during the UMAT to work on the questions. Don’t stop until the supervisor says stop!

 

10 Tips For During The UMAT

You have rehearsed for this day for the past few months, so here are a few final tips that you have no doubt heard before. We want to make sure that you have as smooth a UMAT experience as possible.

Please share this article with your friends or family if you think they need some final tips as well.

1. Read and Think carefully.

Consider all the choices in each question on the UMAT. Don’t lose points on easy UMAT questions through careless mistakes.

2. Use your UMAT test booklet.

Your UMAT answer sheet must be kept neat and free of stray marks, but you can mark up your UMAT test booklet. You can write whatever you want, wherever you want on it. However, you will not receive credit for anything written in the booklet. Below are some tips as to how to use your UMAT test booket:

  • Mark each question that you don’t answer on the UMAT so that you can easily find it again
  • Draw a line through each choice as you eliminate it when working on a question on the UMAT
  • Mark important sections, sentences or words in the stimulus.
  • Make drawings to help you figure out word problems
  • Mark key information on the graphs
  • Add information to drawings and diagrams on the UMAT as you work on them

3. Check your answer sheet regularly to make sure you are in the right place.

Losing your place on the UMAT answer sheet will affect your test results. Check that the number of the UMAT question and the number on the answer sheet matches every few questions. This is especially important when you skip a question on the UMAT.

4. Work at an even, steady pace, but keep moving.

Don’t spend too much time working through hard questions on the UMAT that you lose time to find and answer the easier questions on the UMAT. Try to work on less time-consuming questions before moving on to those that require more time. you can also save time on the UMAT by marking questions as you work on them and crossing out choices as you move through the UMAT.

5. Keep track of time during the UMAT.

You have a total of 3 hours to complete the UMAT. Develop a habit of occasionally checking your progress through the UMAT. That way, you know when you are a quarter of the way through the time allotted, when you are half-way through the UMAT and when you only have 5 minutes left. If you have any time left over on the UMAT, use it to check your answers.

6. Know which questions on the UMAT are best for you.

After practicing the different kinds of questions on the drills and practice UMAT exams, you will probably know which type of questions you are most comfortable with. Some questions, you will find, will take you longer than others. It may help to begin with the type of questions you feel most comfortable with, rather than the very beginning of the booklet.

If you do adopt this tip, just be sure to mark in your UMAT test booklet which question you skipped so you can return to it.

7. Answer the easy questions on the UMAT first

Once you know where the easy and hard questions are on the UMAT, answer the easy questions before tackling the more time-consuming questions on the UMAT.

8. Think positively on the UMAT

Getting down on yourself during the UMAT does more than make you feel bad. It is taking away the confidence and support your body needs to solve problems. It can even distract  you. Try to keep your confidence up, and focus on each question on the UMAT.

The UMAT aims to display what you know and can do. If you have prepared, you should feel good about yourself and your capabilities!

9. Stay focused on the UMAT

Ignore distractions during the UMAT. Think only of the question in front of you. If you catch yourself daydreaming, bring your focus back to the UMAT.

10. Never give up on the UMAT.

Don’t listen to the little voice in your ear that says “The UMAT is impossibly hard”. Keep going no matter what.

 

Interested in studying Medicine?

If you are, then you need to sit the UMAT. The UMAT (Undergraduate Medicine and Health Sciences Admissions) test is required for entry into most undergraduate medical courses and health science courses.

The UMAT is not a test of knowledge. It tests your skills in three different areas: Logical reasoning and problem solving, understanding people and non-verbal reasoning. These three areas used to be divided into three separately timed sections and completed sequentially during the exam.

However, since last year, questions from the all three areas have been mixed together to form one large exam. This change actually makes the test harder, so it is even more important now to go into the UMAT with an effective test taking strategy.

Should you prepare for the UMAT?

Would you go into your end of year exams without preparing? Entrance into some universities usually have 3 equally weighted criteria: your UMAT score, ATAR score and performance in an interview. So your UMAT score actually plays a significant role as to whether you get into medicine. 

Even though the UMAT isn’t knowledge based, you can dramatically improve your scores by learning new thought processes and familiarising yourself with the types of questions. This will also lower your nervoursness on the day, because you have already encountered UMAT-styled questions. Many other students are treating UMAT preparation as another school subject, except it has an exam earlier in the year! You’ll be at a huge disadvantage if you don’t prepare yourself.

In fact, UMAT prep is even more important now with the new changes to UMAT. Speed reading, and learning how to decode patterns quickly are essential to doing well in the UMAT.

What is the UMAT?

Considering a career in medicine?

Then you need to know about the UMAT.

UMAT stands for Undergraduate Medicine and Health Sciences Admission Test.

It is a three hour exam administered by ACER (The Australian Council for Educational Research), and it tests your ability in three areas:

*logical reasoning & problem solving

*understanding people, and

*non-verbal reasoning

Most Australian and New Zealand Universities use your UMAT score, together with your high school results and your performance at an interview, in their selection of students for medicine, dentistry and health science courses.

There is help available to students who want to get the best possible results in the UMAT. Online courses such as those offered by MedEntry can greatly assist your preparation for the UMAT.

Registrations for the July 2013 UMAT test are already open, so you had better get your skates on!

New: ACER changes to UMAT exam in 2013

In 2013 ACER have made some important changes to the UMAT format.
Whilst the type of questions will not change, the structure of the exam will.
Previously the exam consisted of:
Section 1 (Logical Reasoning & Problem Solving), 48 questions, 70 minutes
Section 2 (Understanding People), 44 questions, 55 minutes
Section 3 (Non-verbal Reasoning), 42 questions, 55 minutes
Now the exam no longer has separate timed divisions for each of Sections 1, 2 and 3.
A ten minute reading only time is given at the start of the test to check for printing accuracy etc.  The three test “constructs” as ACER now terms them, are mixed up throughout the three hour exam.
Students will still receive a score for each “construct” (previously “section”), however this year students’ scores will be reported as an aggregate, rather than an average.
Please click here for more information

ISAT

The ISAT ( International Student Admissions Test) is a three hours computer based multiple choice test which aims to assess students’ intellectual skills and abilities – the foundation of academic success.

The ISAT consists of 100 multiple-choice questions, each with 4-5 answer options to choose from which assess critical reasoning and quantitative reasoning (the ISAT does not test subject specific knowledge).

The ISAT is a mandatory requirement for international applicants to the following courses:

Registration for ISAT 2012 is currently open. Testing is available between 3rd April – 26th October, 2012.

The ISAT consists of 100 multiple-choice questions, each with 4-5 answer options to choose from which assess critical reasoning and quantitative reasoning (the ISAT does not test subject specific knowledge).

Medical Entrance New Zealand – Dunedin

University of Otago

(Dunedin, New Zealand)

Bachelor of Dental Surgery Bachelor of Medical Laboratory Science Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery Bachelor of Physiotherapy

Applications for admission to the Health Sciences Professional Programmes in Dentistry, Medical Laboratory Science, Medicine and Physiotherapy are made via the Otago Health Sciences First Year, Second Year of University Study, Competitive Graduate and Alternative Categories of Admission. The closing date for applications is 5 September 2012. Late applications are not accepted. Successful applicants are admitted to second year classes in 2013.

The total number of places available in each of these second year Health Sciences Professional Programmes for domestic students:

* Dentistry 54 * Medical Laboratory Science 60 * Medicine 266 * Physiotherapy 120

Please note these numbers are distributed throughout all categories of admission to each Professional Programme.

For details regarding admission to the Health Sciences Professional Programmes please refer to www.otago.ac.nz/HealthSciences.

Applicants have the opportunity to apply under the Maori and/or Pacific Origins subcategories for entry to the Professional Programmes.  In addition, Medicine applicants can apply under the Rural Origins subcategory.

General Information

Students wishing to enrol in the Health Sciences First Year Programme for 2013 must register by 10 December 2012, although late registrations can be made.

International students wishing to apply for Dentistry, Medical Laboratory Science, Medicine or Physiotherapy should contact the International Office, University of Otago, PO Box 56, Dunedin, New Zealand.

Australian citizens and Australian Permanent Residents are not considered international students.

Further information is available at: www.otago.ac.nz/HealthSciences.