Tag Archives: Medical Entry Australia

Interested in studying Medicine?

If you are, then you need to sit the UMAT. The UMAT (Undergraduate Medicine and Health Sciences Admissions) test is required for entry into most undergraduate medical courses and health science courses.

The UMAT is not a test of knowledge. It tests your skills in three different areas: Logical reasoning and problem solving, understanding people and non-verbal reasoning. These three areas used to be divided into three separately timed sections and completed sequentially during the exam.

However, since last year, questions from the all three areas have been mixed together to form one large exam. This change actually makes the test harder, so it is even more important now to go into the UMAT with an effective test taking strategy.

Should you prepare for the UMAT?

Would you go into your end of year exams without preparing? Entrance into some universities usually have 3 equally weighted criteria: your UMAT score, ATAR score and performance in an interview. So your UMAT score actually plays a significant role as to whether you get into medicine. 

Even though the UMAT isn’t knowledge based, you can dramatically improve your scores by learning new thought processes and familiarising yourself with the types of questions. This will also lower your nervoursness on the day, because you have already encountered UMAT-styled questions. Many other students are treating UMAT preparation as another school subject, except it has an exam earlier in the year! You’ll be at a huge disadvantage if you don’t prepare yourself.

In fact, UMAT prep is even more important now with the new changes to UMAT. Speed reading, and learning how to decode patterns quickly are essential to doing well in the UMAT.

What is the UMAT?

Considering a career in medicine?

Then you need to know about the UMAT.

UMAT stands for Undergraduate Medicine and Health Sciences Admission Test.

It is a three hour exam administered by ACER (The Australian Council for Educational Research), and it tests your ability in three areas:

*logical reasoning & problem solving

*understanding people, and

*non-verbal reasoning

Most Australian and New Zealand Universities use your UMAT score, together with your high school results and your performance at an interview, in their selection of students for medicine, dentistry and health science courses.

There is help available to students who want to get the best possible results in the UMAT. Online courses such as those offered by MedEntry can greatly assist your preparation for the UMAT.

Registrations for the July 2013 UMAT test are already open, so you had better get your skates on!

Medical Entrance New Zealand – Dunedin

University of Otago

(Dunedin, New Zealand)

Bachelor of Dental Surgery Bachelor of Medical Laboratory Science Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery Bachelor of Physiotherapy

Applications for admission to the Health Sciences Professional Programmes in Dentistry, Medical Laboratory Science, Medicine and Physiotherapy are made via the Otago Health Sciences First Year, Second Year of University Study, Competitive Graduate and Alternative Categories of Admission. The closing date for applications is 5 September 2012. Late applications are not accepted. Successful applicants are admitted to second year classes in 2013.

The total number of places available in each of these second year Health Sciences Professional Programmes for domestic students:

* Dentistry 54 * Medical Laboratory Science 60 * Medicine 266 * Physiotherapy 120

Please note these numbers are distributed throughout all categories of admission to each Professional Programme.

For details regarding admission to the Health Sciences Professional Programmes please refer to www.otago.ac.nz/HealthSciences.

Applicants have the opportunity to apply under the Maori and/or Pacific Origins subcategories for entry to the Professional Programmes.  In addition, Medicine applicants can apply under the Rural Origins subcategory.

General Information

Students wishing to enrol in the Health Sciences First Year Programme for 2013 must register by 10 December 2012, although late registrations can be made.

International students wishing to apply for Dentistry, Medical Laboratory Science, Medicine or Physiotherapy should contact the International Office, University of Otago, PO Box 56, Dunedin, New Zealand.

Australian citizens and Australian Permanent Residents are not considered international students.

Further information is available at: www.otago.ac.nz/HealthSciences.

Medical Interview Training Melbourne

The UMAT and the ATAR scores are not the only selection criteria for undergraduate Medicine and Health Science Courses. Many courses around Australia also involve an interview component as part of their selection process. Depending on the institution, interviews could take the form of a traditional panel interview, an oral assessment or as a Multistation/Multiple Mini Interview. UMAT Interview provides a list of all of the universities in Australia and New Zealand that offer undergraduate Medicine, and the type of interview structure they use for selection.

It is just as important to prepare for the interview as it is to prepare for the UMAT and your final year exams. Medical Interview Training Melbourne assists students in anticipating the types of questions/scenarios they will be exposed to in an interview, practice their responses and also take part in a mock interview. The sessions are conducted in small groups of between ten to twenty students, allowing personalised feedback and interaction to occur. An expert will facilitate the session and provide feedback on everything from interview technique to the intricacies of students’ answers. Medical Interview Training Sessions are extremely valuable as most students exhibit anxiety in anticipation of challenging questions that may arise and  have difficulty formulating logical, cohesive, polished answers in an interview situation or within the allotted preparation time prior to the start of each station (during an MMI). Some quality UMAT preparation organisations will include Medical Interview Training as part of their packages or services.

Medical Interview Training Melbourne provides an example of and details regarding such Medical Interview Training Sessions in Melbourne.

10 Tips for UMAT Success!

1. PREPARE! If you wanted to do well in a test, you wouldn’t walk in unprepared. The UMAT is no different, despite what ACER may say. Make sure you prepare appropriately for the test by exposing yourself to UMAT style questions that you are likely to receive on the day so that you can hone you logical reasoning and and problem solving skills as they are essential to scoring high on the UMAT.

2. UMAT Prep Courses – beware of the scams! There are many websites that claim to be UMAT prep organisations when they are actually scam websites. If you avoid these websites and go with a good quality UMAT preparation organisation, you are sure to get the quality preparation that you pay for so that you can practice your UMAT skills, gage your strengths and weaknesses and improve your ability to respond efficiently to questions in a timely manner.

3. Don’t leave your preparation to the last minute! The skills required to succeed in the UMAT cannot be learnt the night before. Make sure you don’t leave all your practice exams and questions to the last minute. If you practice consistently over a longer period of time the skills will consolidate and you will have time to improve in all areas as well as focusing on your weaknesses. If you are cramming the night before you will not be aware of your strengths and weaknesses and will most likely be wasting a whole heap of good value practice exams because you were ‘saving them for later’.

4. Speed Reading! It would be beneficial take a speed reading course as part of your UMAT preparation, particularly for sections 1 and 2. The whole of section 2 is based around comprehending large chunks of text, and in section 1 there are many questions which also involve reading a large text. You want to waste as little time as possible reading but you do not want to rush through it as you will not understand very much and you may have to go back over what you have already read. A speed reading course will help you increase your reading speed and your ability to understand and pick out the key ideas in the text whilst speed reading.

5. Be organised! Depending on the time you are allocated you may need to get up really early on the day of the UMAT and if not it is still important to be organised. Have all of the things you need (ie. pencils, admission ticket, correct identification, transportation) organised the night before (or earlier) so that you do not have to stress of worry about them on the morning. You don’t want to be printing out your ticket or searching for the correct pencils right before your exam. You want to be calm and collected going into the exam, not stressed and flustered.

6. Arrive Early! Make sure you organise to get to your designated UMAT testing centre by the designated reporting time on your admission ticket. Allow for any transportation mishaps (like missing your train or being stuck in traffic). Also, you may want to take a snack while you are lining up to go in. The lines are really long and you can’t take any food or drink other than bottled water into the test. If if the test has started and you are late you will not be allowed in (the UMAT begins once all of the pre-testing procedures – checking of Admission Tickets and identification have been completed).

7. Time management is key! One of the most daunting factors of the UMAT for candidates is the sheer amount of work that needs to be done in a short amount of time. This is where the preparation comes in. If you have practiced UMAT style questions you are likely to be faster and more efficient at answering the questions. If you feel you are spending too much time on a question, take an educated guess and move on so that you have time to come back to it at the end (do not leave it blank, because if you run out of time, you cannot go back and you will be left with an unanswered question).

8. Utilise your nervous energy! On the day of the UMAT it is healthy to be a little bit nervous. Psychological studies have shown that people perform poorly when they are not aroused or when they are too aroused. If you are extremely stressed you are likely to become easily confused and misinterpret questions. Without any anxiety you will not perform as actively as you would with slight arousal. If you have a little bit of nervous energy and you are able to harness it, your performance will be heightened and it will allow you too perform at your best level.

9. Have confidence in your abilities! If you go into the test with a negative mindset, expecting to perform poorly, this will be the case. You should go into the UMAT confident in all of your preparation with a ‘can do’ attitude in order to make the most of the UMAT and score as high as possible! A positive mindset may be a small factor, but it does contribute significantly to a person’s performance in any test.

10. Don’t try and think like the test writer! Be careful if you are trying to think like the test writer or assuming they are trying to trick you (even if they are). You could waste valuable time channelling the writer when you could be using that time to use the methods and logic you learnt and prepared in order to answer the question correctly. Beware of the endless “what do they think I will think?” cycle. You may end up completely confusing yourself and will gain no ground on selecting the right answer.

Project 2012: Uncapping university places

From 2012 universities will no longer receive guaranteed funding for a set number of student places. Universities now need to compete for students and their funding depends on how many students they can attract. The Government is adopting an ‘uncapped’ system of funding that is based on university student demand. In the previous system of ‘capped’ places, Universities that were low in demand were protected because each University was given a certain number of students regardless of who actually wanted to go there.

The students turned away from those Universities in high demand were generally given a place in one of their second or third preferences. Now, instead of the funding being allocated to the Universities, it is going to be allocated to the students and they are entitled to spend it wherever they choose. It is argued that by allowing students more choice and greater chances of getting into the University they want, students will find the idea of University more attractive than they did before. For those Universities in low demand, the difficulty of attracting students may increase as they are thrown into competition with other Universities.

In theory, from 2012, Universities will be able to enrol as many students as they wish in all faculties except for Medicine. For Medical students the funding and number of places will remain capped. Why are places in Medicine remaining capped? In the long run, doctors cost the Government money. The government has no problem with churning out engineers or lawyers left, right and centre, because after university they are independent. The Government wants to control the number of doctors that leave University because the government still needs to provide them funds throughout their practicing years. To uncap the number of places in Medicine would greatly increase the number of doctors that graduate from University and hence drastically increase future government costs. This is one of the reasons why demand for places in medicine will always remain high and hence they had to use other means for selection such as the UMAT.